Men’s Mental health Matters

Men’s Mental health Matters

A Call for Support and Understanding

Men’s mental health is a critical issue, yet it remains underreported and poorly understood. The National Mental Health Survey 2015-16 reveals that mental morbidity is more prevalent in males (13.9%) than in females (7.5%). Despite this, men seldom seek treatment due to societal norms that discourage emotional expression and vulnerability. In England, 78% of all suicides are male, with suicide being the leading cause of death for men aged 20-49. Similarly, in the United States, the male suicide rate is 3.5 times higher than that of females. In India, the 2021 Accidental Deaths & Suicides report shows a 72.5-to-27.5 male-to-female suicide ratio, with over 73,900 more men committing suicide than women. This disparity is evident across all age groups over 18 and various social statuses.

Depression affects over six million men annually, often manifesting as substance abuse or aggression, unlike in women, who generally discuss their issues more openly. Anxiety disorders also impact around 50% of men, with symptoms such as muscle pain, headaches, sleep disturbances, anger, and irritability. The societal pressure to maintain a muscular physique can lead to eating disorders in men, differing from the weight loss focus in women.

Addressing these challenges requires creating an environment where men feel safe to seek help and express emotions without judgment. Promoting open conversations about mental health, reducing stigma, and providing supportive networks are essential. Healthcare professionals, policymakers, and society must recognize and address the unique mental health needs of men.